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Dear Dr. Kate: Is a Post-Toothpaste Tingly Oral Session Safe?

September 28, 2011

1 Comment

photo by sahxic

Dr. Kate is an OB/GYN at one of the largest teaching hospitals in New York City and she answers your medical questions here every two weeks. To ask her your own question, click here.

Dear Dr. Kate,

Lately my manpanion has been going down on me at night following teethbrushing. Needless to say, the oral has been extra tingly. Do I need to be concerned that some of the chemicals in toothpaste are not good for my lady parts?

– Ms. Clean

Dear M.C.,

In general, I follow the philosophy of “listen to your body.” If something is causing you discomfort or pain, you should stop it. But if it’s just an extra-fine tingly sensation that adds to your pleasure, I’d simply enjoy it! To be clear: I wouldn’t advocate layering on the toothpaste to your clitoris and leaving it on like a mask, no matter how good it feels — prolonged exposure to chemicals on your vulva tends to end badly. But I don’t think that toothpaste residue on your fella’s tongue and lips is likely to cause damage.

– Dr. Kate
Gynotalk
dr_kate_100

Dr. Kate is an OB/GYN at one of the largest teaching hospitals in New York City. She also lectures nationally on women’s health issues and conducts research on reproductive health. Check out more of her advice and ask her a question at Gynotalk.com.



Dear Dr. Joe, Can You Break Your Penis During Sex?

September 21, 2011

2 Comments


photo via Flickr

Every few weeks, Dr. Joe DeOrio, a urologist in Chicago, tackles questions about male sexuality here on EMandLO.com. To ask Dr. Joe your own question, click here.

Dear Dr. Joe,

I’ve heard a penis can be broken during sex. How does it happen and what does it entail? And is it then broken forever, or can it be fully fixed?

– Ain’t Broke

Dear A.B., Read the rest of this entry »



Dear Dr. Kate: I Achieve Hands-Free Orgasms When I Have to Pee

September 14, 2011

2 Comments

photo via beautifulagony.com

Dr. Kate is an OB/GYN at one of the largest teaching hospitals in New York City and she answers your medical questions here every two weeks. To ask her your own question, click here.

Dear Dr. Kate,

I’m almost 30 and recently experienced my first orgasm with external stimulation (a vibrator). By that, I mean I had never had one with another person or by masturbating. However, since my pre-teen years, I’ve been able to make myself orgasm when I have to pee. It goes like this: I need to pee, I think a few sexy thoughts, I squeeze my thighs together, and there it goes.

Unless I have to pee really badly, I can usually get a few in before I really need to go to the bathroom. Also, I’ve tried to have a Lady Gaga-style mental orgasm without needing to pee and it doesn’t work — I can only do it when I have to pee. I didn’t actually think it was an orgasm until I had a “real” one. Admittedly, these are different –they’re not as powerful, there’s not the same intense buildup, etc. — but it’s definitely an orgasm. What’s the medical explanation here? Is it dangerous? Can other people do this or do I have some kind of superpower!?

– Orgasm Girl

Dear O.G.,

Well, I think you’re Wonder Woman, even without the wrist cuffs and spandex! Most women think that stimulation of the clitoris is the only way to get aroused. But the clitoris is actually just the tip of your sexual iceberg. The thousands of nerves that lead to arousal start at the surface of your body but travel back into your body for almost a foot. Since your pelvis is so sexually wired, various different positions and activities can cause you to become aroused and even orgasm.

In your case, it’s the combination of a full bladder and thigh muscle contraction. So there’s nothing wrong with your body, and it’s certainly not dangerous. And like most superheroes, those with special abilities tend to keep them hidden — meaning, we really don’t know how common this ability is. So just enjoy it.

– Dr. Kate
Gynotalk
dr_kate_100

Dr. Kate is an OB/GYN at one of the largest teaching hospitals in New York City. She also lectures nationally on women’s health issues and conducts research on reproductive health. Check out more of her advice and ask her a question at Gynotalk.com.



Dear Dr. Vanessa, My Boyfriend Cries “Cheater!” on the Days I Feel “Looser”

September 7, 2011

6 Comments

photo via Flickr

Every few weeks, Dr. Vanessa Cullins, a board-certified obstetrician/gynecologist and vice president for medical affairs at Planned Parenthood® Federation of America, will be answering your questions on EMandLO.com. To ask her your own question, click here.

Dear Dr. Vanessa,

My boyfriend gets upset that sometimes my vagina is looser than other times. He thinks I’m cheating, but I’m not. What’s going on?

– Lucy Goosey

Dear LG,

Here are five possibilities: Read the rest of this entry »



Dear Dr. Kate: How Long Will It Take to Cleanse My Scent?

August 31, 2011

0 Comments

photo by Tambako The Jaguar

Dr. Kate is an OB/GYN at one of the largest teaching hospitals in New York City and she answers your medical questions here every two weeks. To ask her your own question, click here.

Dear Dr. Kate,

I’ve read your post ”Why Does My Vagina Taste Bitter Sometimes?” Okay, so I do smoke and drink. If I stop drinking and smoking right now, how long will it take for that ”bitter taste” to go away?

– Little Miss Vice

Dear L.M.V.,

That’s a great question, to which I only have a lame answer. I don’t know for sure. It’s difficult to predict how quickly your body would respond to getting rid of the toxins in cigarettes — it may take a week, and it may take a whole menstrual cycle. But it should work at some point, and I enthusiastically applaud any efforts to quit smoking in particular. So know that you’re doing the best thing for your health, and a great thing for your vagina.

– Dr. Kate
Gynotalk
dr_kate_100

Dr. Kate is an OB/GYN at one of the largest teaching hospitals in New York City. She also lectures nationally on women’s health issues and conducts research on reproductive health. Check out more of her advice and ask her a question at Gynotalk.com.



Dear Dr. Joe, What’s Up with Adult Circumcision?

August 24, 2011

0 Comments

photo via Flickr

Every few weeks, Dr. Joe DeOrio, a urologist in Chicago, tackles questions about male sexuality here on EMandLO.com. To ask Dr. Joe your own question, click here.

Dear Dr. Joe,

What’s the deal with adult circumcision? Is it crazy painful? What’s the recovery like? Can a guy expect sensitivity to be reduced?

– Circurious

Dear C, Read the rest of this entry »



Dear Dr. Kate: Can You Get Pregnant Without Intercourse?

August 17, 2011

1 Comment

photo by Marina(im.back)

Dr. Kate is an OB/GYN at one of the largest teaching hospitals in New York City and she answers your medical questions here every two weeks. To ask her your own question, click here.

Dear Dr. Kate,

Can you get pregnant without having actual intercourse? And if so, how?

– Curious Georgina

Dear C.G.,

In theory you can, though I don’t know if it’s ever been proven. If you’re aroused and lubricated, and your partner ejaculates near your vagina (via masturbation or “outercourse”), it’s possible that some sperm could “ride the wave” into your body and travel all the way up to a waiting egg. It’s certainly not likely that someone could get pregnant this way, and I’d never recommend this approach for someone who wants to get pregnant. But if you really don’t want to be pregnant, I’d take no chances — keep all sperm far from your vagina (preferably in a condom).

– Dr. Kate
Gynotalk
dr_kate_100

Dr. Kate is an OB/GYN at one of the largest teaching hospitals in New York City. She also lectures nationally on women’s health issues and conducts research on reproductive health. Check out more of her advice and ask her a question at Gynotalk.com.



Dear Dr. Kate: All My Special Places Are Too Tender!

August 3, 2011

0 Comments

photo by mistress_f

Dr. Kate is an OB/GYN at one of the largest teaching hospitals in New York City and she answers your medical questions here every two weeks. To ask her your own question, click here.

Dear Dr. Kate,

Recently, all my special places have become so tender. My boyfriend can’t touch my nipples or clitoris without me pulling away from him in pain. I can’t even masturbate anymore as I used to, it literally takes like two or three touches to my clitoris to send me over the edge. This is a bit annoying because it’s not tender in a good way, but tender in a painful way! I haven’t changed my diet or my birth control pills and I’ve gotten a period for the past however many months I can remember. What could this be? Should I be worried?

– Hurts So Bad

Dear H.S.B.,

Pain is generally a sign that something is wrong, so I think a visit to your gyno is in order. Are any other parts of your body suddenly painful to touch, or just your nipples and clitoris? Are you able to have intercourse, or is that too painful as well? She should do a thorough physical exam to look for any tiny ulcers or lesions that could be a sign of an STD (not likely on your nipples, but more on your vulva).

She may also see signs of vulvar vestibulitis, an inflammatory condition that isn’t an infection, but looks like red, angry spots that are incredibly painful to touch. If everything looks completely normal, and your testing is negative, and nothing else is hurting you, it doesn’t sound like something medical is going on. Let’s see what your gyno says, and please write back so we can figure out what the next step should be to get your body back the way it was.

– Dr. Kate
Gynotalk
dr_kate_100

Dr. Kate is an OB/GYN at one of the largest teaching hospitals in New York City. She also lectures nationally on women’s health issues and conducts research on reproductive health. Check out more of her advice and ask her a question at Gynotalk.com.



Dear Dr. Vanessa, What Can I Do About Hairy Areolas?

July 27, 2011

0 Comments

photo via Flickr

Every few weeks, Dr. Vanessa Cullins, a board-certified obstetrician/gynecologist and vice president for medical affairs at Planned Parenthood® Federation of America, will be answering your questions here. To ask her your own question, click here.

Dear Dr. Vanessa,

My areolas are hairy — what can I do?!

– Sasquatch

Dear S,

In general having some hair on the areola, the circle of skin around the nipple, is perfectly normal. It’s just another area where body hair is likely to grow. There is no need to do anything about it. If you do decide you want to remove the hairs, it is easy to do with scissors or tweezers. Some women use hair removal products designed to use on the face, others have the hairs removed with waxing or electrolysis. Many women pluck them, but others warn that plucking can disturb the hair follicle and cause ingrown hairs or infection.

If a woman has so much hair on her breasts that it seems like a man’s chest hair, she may have hirsutism (HER-soot-izm). This is caused by a hormonal imbalance, usually too much testosterone, the hormone most associated with masculinity. Hirsutism can be a symptom of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which is also caused by hormone imbalance. Most women with PCOS develop multiple cysts in their ovaries, hence the name polycystic ovary syndrome. Other symptoms of PCOS may include acne, infrequent periods, longer periods, obesity, and difficulty becoming pregnant. PCOS can lead to diabetes and heart disease in some women.

If you think you have hirsutism, you should visit your health care provider for diagnosis and treatment. If you only have a few hairs around your nipples, you have nothing to worry about.

In the meantime, best wishes for your good sexual health,

Vanessa
Planned Parenthood

dr_vanessa_cullins

Vanessa Cullins, MD, MPH, MBA, is a board-certified obstetrician/gynecologist and vice president for medical affairs at Planned Parenthood® Federation of America.



Dear Dr. Kate: Help, Menopause Sucks!

July 20, 2011

0 Comments

photo by me_and_the_sysop

Dr. Kate is an OB/GYN at one of the largest teaching hospitals in New York City and she answers your medical questions here every two weeks. To ask her your own question, click here.

Dear Dr. Kate,

I need menopause help, this time of my life sucks! I have no urges, no desire, I’m tired, my husband is pissed off all the time, etc, etc. Any advice on herbal remedies? Or anything else that might help? I’ve been to the doctor and she states that lack of sleep, stress, and menopause are why I have no desire.

– Menopissed

Dear Menopissed,

I think your doctor is onto something. Yes, during the time around menopause, your hormone levels are going nuts, and you may feel like you’re going nuts as well. And once you’ve been through menopause, and your periods have stopped completely, replacing your lost hormones may make you feel more normal (and help with the hot flashes).

But it’s not hormones alone that are likely killing your libido. So many things contribute to how sexy you’re feeling and how much sex you want. And exhaustion, stress with work or family, illness, and conflict with your husband can all contribute to your loss of desire. So can bad sex — if sex is uncomfortable, painful, or not enjoyable in general, who would want to have more of it? I’m afraid that there’s no pill, herbal or otherwise, that can provide an easy cure. But addressing the stresses in your life — with your husband, or maybe with a counselor — can help. And if you’re having any issues with sex itself, your gyno should be able to help — with something as simple as a lubricant or more complex like vaginal estrogen supplements.

For further reading, you might also want to check out parts one, two, and three of my Female Sexual Dysfunction Series on this site.

– Dr. Kate
Gynotalk
dr_kate_100

Dr. Kate is an OB/GYN at one of the largest teaching hospitals in New York City. She also lectures nationally on women’s health issues and conducts research on reproductive health. Check out more of her advice and ask her a question at Gynotalk.com.